Mar 17 2015

New Direction part two

In my last post, I showed some of Lowell’s facejugs from the wood kiln. I had a few pots in there, but most were from clay bodies I wanted to test and see how they acted with our clay and glazes in this particular kiln.  More testing, more testing.

Wood Kiln stoked and cooking

I really like a wood kiln. There’s a rhythm to the firing, more so than a gas kiln, that I find appealing. Once you hear that unmistakable low and rumbly whoosh of the flame blow through the kiln shortly after stoking, its very easy to be hooked.

Wood firing down here on the coast has had a burst of popularity in the last several years. Marty and Brenda Stokes, long-time potters from Navarre Florida, deserve a lot of credit for this, since starting their non-profit organization called The Gulf Coast Kiln Walk Society. They have been  instrumental in raising awareness and promoting wood firing. Kiln Walk also holds a biannual wood fire conference in Pensacola some 40 miles from here (its so nice to have something going on like this in this part of the world for a change). When I first came down here 15 or so years ago, there were just a couple of potters with small wood kilns, but that has since ballooned to at least 11 wood kilns, that I can think of off the top of my head, within a couple of hours drive from here, and half of those are anagamas, which is pretty mind boggling if you think about it.

Before we built this kiln, I had my trepidations. While I have enjoyed the wood firings I’ve been able to take part in, I also remember how long it took to recover. Exhaustion, sore feet and muscles, are all things that have stuck with me. There’s no doubt that wood firing, while exciting, is pretty physical and demanding. It can also be heartbreaking when a firing does not go right after you’ve just invested a lot of time, labor, emotion, and money just to make a firing happen. I just wasn’t sure I was up to that.  As I get older, I have a growing appreciation for predictability and consistency and ‘work smarter’ seems like a good mantra. While I like anagama pots, its not the aesthetic I am going for in my work, especially since there are so many people around here that are. So I looked around and spoke with a lot of people and most agreed that this ‘manabigama’ is not hard to fire, gets good results, is a manageable size, fires efficiently and in a manageable amount of time so two people can fire it quite easily. I conceded.

Beside dreams of wood pottery, I continue to explore carved designs on pots. I had been carving designs into raku pots but I was really looking for working exclusively in the high fire. I was getting tired of always smelling like a campfire. Doing raku for production may seem romantic to some, but is not nearly as fun as just doing it now and again.

Porcelain Dogwood Bas Relief Vase by Anne WebbSince I was using a grogless clay for my functional ware, I carved a few bas relief designs with that clay and thought that it would be really nice in porcelain. Its not a fast process, but  its very cool to see the design emerge as I carve away the different layers in a design.

Last year I also started to explore sgraffito. I was doing a demo of the technique for a student and had an ‘ahha’ moment and could see definite possibilities for this technique on pots and tiles. I continue to explore.

 

I used to watch and love a show on PBS called ‘Connections‘ years ago, hosted was James Burke. If you remember it too, you can probably appreciate that no new idea comes from a vacuum. I think Mr Burke called it ‘The Trigger Effect’.

Flare bowl with sgraffito carved fish designI do love carving into clay. I wonder where it will take me next.


Oct 27 2011

Potters of Japan

Someone the first part of this video series by Peeler Ceramic Art Films, on Facebook and I thought I would share it here as well.  I’m not sure what date these originally came out, but they kind of look like they’re from the 60s or earlier.  I love seeing these older pottery documentaries and hope you do too.

Part 1:

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Part 2:

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Feb 22 2011

In the studio today

Well the conference is over, the weather is fine, and I’m finally back in the studio. Yay!

Bas Relief on porcelain

Continuing to work on carving some bas relief designs on porcelain pieces I had thrown before the weekend. Its a bit of a leap of faith.. you commit all that time carving a design and hope for the best that they come out fine in the firing and all the glazes do what they’re supposed to be doing. ..on to the bisque firing they go!

Dogwood relief

Well on Saturday, despite the greatest of intentions, I didn’t end up taking very many pictures at all, but here are just a few more shots from the conference for you, this time of the three presenters: Chris Gustin, Misty Gamble, and Christa Assad.

Chris GustinMisty GambleChrista Assad

(fyi Next year’s conference will be in Birmingham and run by Scott Bennett)

It takes a few days to fully digest what one has seen at any workshop or conference. Sometimes you come away just brimming with excitement, inspiration and ideas, and are just rearing to go! Other times, well,.. it just takes a bit longer.

I have a question for you now.. If you were to attend a clay conference, what would you expect/like/want to see? What would you like to take away from the experience? Any dislikes…? Please comment


Feb 12 2011

The Art of Slip Trailing

I’ve long admired the skill it takes to slip trail a design on a pot and make it look right. Not only do you have to execute an artful design and be sure of your line, it takes some coordination, being aware at all times of the exact amount of pressure you have on the bottle to control the flow of slip and have it come out in a controlled and continuous flowing line. Air bubbles in the slip bottle can be disastrous, and a clogged tip can break your flow too.

Here are just a couple of video links I came across by people who have got it down. The first is Scottish potter, Hannah McAndrew. Her work is quite lovely and in the long slipware pottery tradition of Great Britain.

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And here is Minnesota’s own Paul and Denise Morris of Morris Pottery, who do wonderful slip trailed designs on wood fired pots. Denise, slip trailing here in the video, sure makes it look effortless.

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Enjoy!


Oct 16 2009

Blog Action Day 2009: Climate change

Blog Action Day is an annual event held every October 15 that unites the world’s bloggers in posting about the same issue on the same day with the aim of sparking discussion around an issue of global importance.

I remember as a child going to Man and His World (the site for Expo ’67, the 1967 International and Universal Exposition) in Montreal, and visiting all the international pavillions. I remember in particular the American Pavillion and always seemed to gravitate to it whenever we visited.  It was a huge, clear panelled geodesic dome structure that really stood out among the rest of the buildings.  It being so long ago,   I admit, memories are a little vague, but I have fleeting images of the experience such as the sun blaring through the glass.. vegetation lining paths on the ground level.. futuristic bits of art and culture.. stairs going up to a different level where screening rooms with films about acid rain, air & water pollution, the depletion of the ozone layer, etc. , etc, were shown.

Biosphere Montreal Expo 67I know I was young, but it obviously left an impression on me, because I still remember it.  The warning was clear that we should be very conscientious of how we live, how we treat the environment, and take care of the world around us, or the fragile natural world as we know it will be lost for future generations.

Despite what certain special interest groups tell us and want us what to believe, I think its naive to think that the climate change is not real and that we can keep on the way we have been.   Human activities might not be the only reason why global warming is occurring, but it is occurring nonetheless. The exponential growth of human populations and industrialization has had a huge impact on the ecosystem and has undoubtedly helped to expedite climate change.  We’ve known about it for a long time but denying a problem does not make it go away.   On that note…

Over the last few days, I’ve tried to think of how life at our studio might relate to the global warming. Thinking back, most of the changes we have implemented in the past few years were for economic reasons, but they have spinoff benefits that are releva for the  environment as well.  In the past 9 or so years, the cost of propane (we glaze fire in a gas kiln) has more than doubled and the cost of raw materials and shipping has gone up by at least 1/3.  Working smarter and more efficiently , obviously, has become all that more of a priority.

THE KILN

Nitride Bonded ShelvesWhen I think of climate change and how it relates to pottery, what first comes to mind is my kiln which uses propane.  A fuel burning anything is a potential area of concern when you are trying to reduce your carbon footprint.  One thing working in our favor is that  our studio and kiln are located on a treed 5 acre plot of land.  A friend yesterday reminded me as well that propane does burn more efficiently and releases less particulates and pollutants into the air than, say, a wood kiln or even a salt kiln.

So working with what we have, we have tried to make some changes to help it fire more efficiently and use less fuel.  A big change we made about a year ago was getting some of those new nitride bonded silicon carbide shelves which are much thinner (and lighter) than regular kiln shelves and take require less energy to heat up. (When you fire a kiln, you heat everything in the kiln.. the pots, the shelves, the posts… everything. Anything extra you have means that much more energy consumed.)  So anyways, we did that and replaced the flat top with an arch and I was delighted to discover that the firing took a fraction of the propane it did previously.  Something else that we just did this last firing is reduce the pressure at the regulator on the propane tank. Again, much less propane was used. Brilliant. More firings for less and what fuel we did use what burned that much more efficiently.

NATIVE CLAY

Like propane and natural gas, the cost of raw materials has shot up.  Thankfully we dig most of the clay we use locally. We do this for a number of reasons. Besides the fact that it is very responsive and throws beautifully, it being so readily available and so close to the studio definitely works in our favor. Since we process it ourselves, it is a little cheaper plus we don’t have the additional expense of shipping it down from places like Ohio, Atlanta, California, and some other such places where clay is commercially processed and distributed from.  The environmental impact?  Well, one benefit is there is one less truck on the road and therefore less emissions released into the atmosphere.

OTHER THINGS

We usually have to travel away to do art shows and fairs, so for a number of reasons, we’ve lightened up the weight of our show display so when we do have to travel, its a lighter load and hopefully less wear on the vehicle, less gas, and less emissions.

Shows, Quality not Quantity –  What with the economy, rising show fees and travel expenses,  and the uncertainty of shows, like  many craftspeople,  we have been forced to be a lot more selective about where we go and what shows we do. Consequently that often means travelling less and sticking closer to home.  The internet has also made promotion to a broader audience without travel possible.

At home, I am trying to make changes as well. I switched (mostly out of necessity) from a large SUV to a Toyota Corolla which helps consumption, and switched out all my light bulbs for flourescents or compact florescents bulbs. My gasoline and electric bills have both gone down considerably as a result.  There’s always room for improvement though. I started the summer with plans for a big vegetable garden, but this year with things that come up, as they seem to do, the more invasive weeds just took over. But there is always next year, when I hope to have better luck with planting in raised beds.

So no matter what your lifestyle or how small your operation is, changes to our lifestyle and how we work are possible. Even small changes can have a positive effect on the environment.


Aug 4 2009

APTV Alabama Craft & their Online Art Auction

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Alabama Public Television, a few months ago, had aired their wonderful two-part documentary Alabama Craft: Tradition and Innovation, which featured seven notable and talented craftspeople  from across the state, and their work.

Peacock Feather Lidded Raku VesselFrom July 16th through August, APTV is hosting an Online Art Auction via eBay, featuring work by the artists in the film as well other contributing Alabama artists (including yours truly. My piece, pictured here, will come up for auction Aug 6th).  “All of the funds raised will go to support the education mission of Alabama Public Television, and help us continue to make films like Alabama Craft.”

The list of artists include: Mozell Benson (Folk Quilts), Cal Breed (Glasswork), Jerry Brown (Folk Pottery), Steve Dark (Folk Pottery), Frank Fleming (Porcelain Sculpture), Ham Allen (Folk Pottery), William Gene Ivey (Instrument Maker/Fiddles), Bettye Kimbrell (Heritage Quilts), Cam Langley (Glasswork), Bruce Larsen (Mixed Media Sculpture), Charlie Lucas (Folk/Mixed Media), Bertice McPherson (Ceramic Sculpture), Eric Miller (Folk Pottery), Steve Miller (Folk Pottery), John Phillips (Metalworks), Tut Riddick (Paint), Charles Smith (Pottery), Anne Webb (Pottery), and Yvonne Wells (Quilts).

To learn more about the auction, the artists, and the art, please visit the   APTV Online Art Auction Home page.

Make your bid today to support a great cause!


Feb 3 2009

AlabamaGoods.com

alabamagoods.com Coffee and Webb Dragonfly MugWe were contacted last fall by the folks at AlabamaGoods.com who wanted to add some of our pottery to their shop online.

Opened in 2007, the  AlabamaGoods.com site is focused on selling items from Alabama, ranging from pickles to pottery to clothing items.

Pictured here, our stoneware pottery mug has been paired up with some O’Henry’s CoffeesSumatra Gold Roast and offered as a corporate gift box set on the AlabamaGoods.com site:  http://alabamagoods.com/clay-mug-coffee.html


Dec 5 2008

Just a reminder.. Hope we see you tomorrow!

Coastal Artisans Show Dec 6 postcards Can you believe that it will already be December 6th tomorrow?

Don’t forget to join us at the  Mobile Botanical Gardens between 9 am and 4 pm for the Coastal Artisans’ 3rd Annual Christmas Art Show and Sale.

For more info about the artists and directions to the Gardens, please visit: http://thecoastalartisans.blogspot.com


Dec 5 2008

Bending cones and The Frozen Tank

Webb decorated bisque ware I love the look of pots all laid out whether they be green ware or pots  waiting to be loaded in the gas kiln, as these are.   The mugs almost remind me of a regiment of soldiers, or a tightly packed school of fish all swimming in the same direction.

I’ve been finishing up a gas firing this morning, busily trying to keep the gas tank from freezing up until the propane truck finally makes it here this afternoon.  We’re cutting it pretty close though.. down to less than 5% in the tank and I have the garden hose dribbling some water on it so I don’t lose gas pressure completely.   Thankfully though,  cone 9 is bending evenly top and bottom so we’re in the home stretch.

I made a little adjustment to the way my target bricks were positioned this time (an experiment) in hopes of making the firing more efficient.  Evidently it has had some effect because the last time the kiln was stacked similarly, I had a good cone or 2 difference from top to bottom .   I guess I’ll only know for sure once the kiln is opened.

Looking forward to this kiln opening. I have several pots in there with clay from our new clay deposit I mentioned in my last post.


Nov 24 2008

In Pursuit of Perfect Clay.. part deux

A couple of weeks ago we had a dumptruck load of clay delivered from the new clay deposit.  I guestimated the pile was around 5 tons or so, but as it turns out, our neighbor, who drives for the same kind of truck, told me one of those trucks heaped up with clay like it was, holds something closer to 27 tons (or more?)!!  All 27 tons, just for the cost of trucking it to our studio not 15 – 20 miles away.  (If you have bought commercially prepared clay, you can probably do the math for what the equivalent would be).

We’ve left the dumped clay uncovered and open to the elements now for two weeks or so, in order for the rain to wash away a little of the residual sand off that was picked up in the dump truck onto the clay’s surface. The mound is already starting to turn from a reddy orange to more of a amethyst-y pink clay color.  Yesterday I broke apart a clump  to reveal a piece of nice, clean, sandless solid clay.   Since the time the of the delivery, three or four batches of clay have been mixed.  I have thrown some of it,  and the rest I have left to age a little more.  ..well, until tomorrow, at least, when I start my throwing cycle again.

best digging toolBefore it was time to mix the second batch, though, Lowell took me out to the new deposit site for the first time to help gather some dryer clay for the mix, since the clay we already had at the studio was still a little too damp to crush to a powder.  So off we went..

We drove for about 20 minutes down familiar roads and around familiar turns, when all of the sudden Lowell turned into a little dirt driveway entrance.  It was a lot closer than I thought it would be.

clay mountainWell!  I thought the truck load that was delivered was a lot, but I saw where it was excavated from and it took barely a dent out of the mountain that lay before me.  Here is a picture of what I first saw.  It stands about 20 feet high and is at least 60 feet long .   Its mostly pink clay, though there are layers of white, and red, and a layer further in the middle of some dark shale-like material which I assume is the remnants of decomposed vegetation .

I was chipping away dry surface clay and filling up my bucket, as  the fog gradually cleared.  It was almost like a dream.  Off to my right, was another clay mountain .. and yet another further on.

excavated hillside revealing striationHere is a photo of a hillside that had been excavated with a backhoe.  Sorry,  I couldn’t get the entire hill in the shot but you can get an idea of the various strata.   This layer starts down about 6 feet from the surface and, in this spot, is about 4-6 feet thick.

I’ll try and post more pictures as I can.